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by Allen Say

illustrated by Allen Say

Summary

School Library Journal:

K-Gr 6- Continuing the story he started in Grandfather’s Journey (Houghton, 1993), Say explores familiar themes of cultural connection and disconnection. He focuses on his mother Masako, or May, as she prefers to be called, who, after graduating from high school in California, unwillingly moves with her parents to their native Japan. She is homesick for her native country and misses American food. She rebels against her parents, who force her to repeat high school so that she can learn “her own language”; the other students tease her for being “gaijin” or a foreigner. Masako leaves home and obtains a job in a department store in Osaka, a city that reminds her of her beloved San Francisco. Her knowledge of English quickly makes her a valued employee and brings her into contact with her future husband, Joseph, a Japanese¬† man who was educated at an English boarding school in Shanghai. They decide that together they can make a life anywhere, and choose to remain in Japan. Say’s many fans will be thrilled to have another episode in his family saga, which he relates with customary grace and elegance. The pages are filled with detailed drawings featuring Japanese architecture and clothing, and because of the artist’s mastery at drawing figures, the people come to life as authentic and sympathetic characters. This is a thoughtful and poignant book that will appeal to a wide range of readers, particularly our nation’s many immigrants who grapple with some of the same challenges as May and Joseph, including feeling at home in a place that is not their own.-Ellen Fader, Multnomah County Library, Portland, OR Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.Awards:

  • ALA Notable Children’s Books: 2000
  • School Library Journal Best Books: 1999

Topics

1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, Ages 0-8, Cultural Differences, Identity, Immigration