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These lesson plans were created by the Carolina Asia Center team to fit the needs of North Carolina teachers.  They align with N.C. standards and common core standards.

This site is under construction, but please browse the lesson plans that are available.

 

Elementary | Middle School | High School | Community College

Elementary

Asian Historical Fiction Book Set Lesson Plan

This lesson plan pairs with our Asian Historical Book Set available through Carolina Navigators. The lesson explores themes in Asian historical fiction through reading comprehension, vocabulary, finding evidence, and visual activities. The teacher models activities with the class with A Song for Cambodia. Then, the students get in reading groups and attempt the activities on new books, including The Coolies, The Lotus Seed, and The Cambodian Dancer. An extension activity is held with themes from the The Dalai Lama. 

Let’s Celebrate! Lunar New Year, Nadaam, and more

Students will celebrate holidays from all around Asia while discussing the meaning of holidays and cultural differences. Students will compare and contrast Lunar New Year, Nadaam, Children’s Day, and Dragon Boat Festival with holidays in the United States. Activities range from reading literature to creating Japanese carp fish kites, koinobori.

One Ticket Please: Immigration to United States

Students will explore Myanmar and China through geography and books. They will then role play what it is like to immigrate from China and to immigrate from Myanmar as a refugee. Afterwards, students will discuss famous citizens who have immigrated from China and Myanmar and how they have shaped the community around them. Students will also discuss how their cultures have permeated life in North Carolina and the United States.  

Along the Silk Road: A Journey of Global Exchange

In this lesson, students will learn about the Silk Road and compare it with global exchanges that are occurring today. Students will begin with an introduction to the meaning of a global exchange. Students will then watch a Ted Talk about the Silk Road, followed by a discussion about the ancient trading routes and the importance of Marco Polo. Students will simulate traveling along the Silk Road by going on a visual tour of key cities. For each “city,” students will map the trade routes and analyze artifacts as a class that range from ceramics to textiles. Students will discuss the importance of the cultural exchange that occurred along the Silk Road and how it is global exchange occurs in their community today.

Middle School

Religion and Dance in India

Students will learn about the impact of religion on Indian culture and society through the dance Bharatanatyam.  They will utilize a reading created with the help of a professor from University of North Carolina and a local community member to analyze a video clip of the dance. Students will also learn about the dance Bhangra and how it is a fusion of Indian and Western cultures. They will read a newspaper article to see how Bhangra has impacted North Carolina and watch a video of University of North Carolina’s Bhangra team. An optional extension is students will create their own Bhangra dance.

Along the Silk Road: A Journey of Global Exchange

In this lesson, students will learn about the Silk Road and compare it with global exchanges that are occurring today. Students will begin with an introduction to the meaning of a global exchange and a review of civilizations. Students will then watch a TedEd Talk about the Silk Road, followed by a discussion about the ancient trading routes and the importance of global travelers like Ibn Battuta. After watching the video, students will then simulate traveling along the Silk Road by visiting stations that represent key cities. At each “city,” students will map the route and analyze artifacts that range from photographs to non-fiction accounts. To conclude the activity, students will discuss the importance of the cultural exchange that occurred along the Silk Road and how global exchange continues to occur in their communities today.

High School

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: A Turning Point in History

Students will debate the American and Japanese point of views of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Students will listen to oral histories and read primary sources to cite as evidence in their debate. They will research the short-term and long-term effects of the atomic bomb, including the increased military competition and the effects on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As extensions, students can write a letter to Harry Truman describing their viewpoint on the atomic bomb decision, pretend to present at a Nuclear Security Summit, or research Japanese-American Internment camps. A DBQ is also included.

Along the Silk Road: A Journey of Global Exchange

In this lesson, students will learn about the Silk Road and compare it with global exchanges that are occurring today. Students will begin with an introduction to the meaning of a global exchange and a review of civilizations. Students will then watch a TedEd Talk about the Silk Road, followed by a discussion about the ancient trading routes and the importance of global travelers like Ibn Battuta. After watching the video, students will then simulate traveling along the Silk Road by visiting stations that represent key cities. At each “city,” students will map the route and analyze artifacts that range from photographs to non-fiction accounts. To conclude the activity, students will discuss the importance of the cultural exchange that occurred along the Silk Road and how global exchange continues to occur in their communities today.

 

Community College